Things You Need to Know about the Full Retirement Age Chart

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The full retirement age is the age when an individual becomes entitled to receive unreduced retirement benefits. It is also known as ‘normal retirement age’. No matter what the retirement age is, you can start receiving retirement benefits from the early age of 62, or even as late as 70.

Ithe n case of early retirement
It is possible for you to retire between age 62 and the full retirement age. If the benefits have started early, they will be decreased by a margin of a percent for every month before your full retirement age. To understand how it works, you need to take a look at the full retirement age chart. The chart shows the reduction amount assuming the monthly benefit of $1000 at full retirement age. Based on your year of birth, you can determine the benefit and the amount of reduction in case you retire between 62 and the full retirement age.

You can use the full retirement age chart to make an informed decision. You need to consider the benefits that might be available to you if you retire at the age of 62 or later. Keeping the same in mind, you can make a decision on when you wish to stop working.

Advantages and disadvantages of early retirement
There are pros and cons of taking the benefits before the full retirement age. When you retire early, you get the benefits for a longer period of time. The disadvantage is that your benefit is reduced with passing time. However, with every individual, the situation varies.

You should remember that if you avoid the benefits until you reach the full retirement age, you may be entitled to delayed retirement credits. This would increase the amount of monthly benefits you receive. There are multiple factors you need to consider when you make a decision about retirement and you need to keep all of them in mind and not just the benefit amount. You may choose to contact Social Security before you decide to retire or you could make use of the full retirement chart for the same.

Retirement is an important decision and you need to keep your personal goals in mind. The decision should not be driven by the amount you will receive in the form of benefits. The decision should be based on numerous others factors, like your willingness or ability to work, other financial commitments, health-related issues, etc.

Marc Jacobs

Author: Marc Jacobs

I am a journalist by profession. I have been working as a journalist for 15 years, first as a reporter and eventually as an Editor. I finished Journalism from the University of the Philippines. I have a Master's Degree in Literature from the University of Santo Tomas, where I graduated cum laude. I am currently taking my PhD in Literature also in UST.